Conservation & Research

THE STATUS OF AFRICAN VULTURES

In 2015, the IUCN Conservation Status of several vulture species were ‘uplisted’ based on their rate of decline. African vultures are facing several threats, making their conservation not a simple task. Poisoning incidences seem to be on the rise, or at least are much more regularly reported. Poisonings occur from a few means – poachers lace elephant or rhino carcasses to intentionally kill vultures and as scavengers, vultures inevitably ingest any poison implemented to kill other animals (either ‘problem’ animals like jackals or leopards) or prized animals targeted by poachers. While a single poisoned elephant can kill hundreds of vultures, wiping out an entire colony or local population, power line electrocutions and collisions are the most profuse threats to vultures in South Africa. The power line grid is expansive and often structures are out of date and unsafe for the large birds to perch on. Superstitious beliefs are prominent, creating a demand for vulture parts, especially the head (brains, eyes) and feet, in the establishment of luck and forecasting the outcomes of events like soccer matches and the national lotto. As humans have expanded over the South African landscape, carcasses from natural deaths are sparse, prompting the creation of over 250 vulture restaurants over Southern Africa. These sites provide food specifically for vulture populations mostly from pig and cattle farm mortalities. These sites are strictly managed as some Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used on cattle can be, even in small amounts, lethal to vultures. Diclofenac in particular (Voltaren for people) caused the deaths of millions of vultures on the Indian Subcontinent in the early 2000’s.

Cape Vulture

Cape Vulture

VULPRO HOLISTIC APPROACH

Non-releasable vultures that come into VulPro for rehabilitation form part of the ex-situ population and are bred to produce individuals which form part of our pilot release studies. GPS transmitters are placed on all released individuals and this data then forms part of our research programmes. We incorporate population monitoring through maintaining a re-sighting database utilising camera traps, photographs and recordings from the general public and, monitoring wild vulture breeding sites. Our presence in the field following vultures has increased landowner engagement as well as improved vulture awareness and this information assists us to keep up to date with anthropomorphic changes in the vulture’s environment which, enables us to keep up with threats and appropriate mitigation measures within different areas. All information gained feeds into our investigative research and often leads to full blown research projects. The interface between in-situ and ex-situ facets continues to engage scientific and veterinary related research including but not limited to diseases, threats, toxicology.

African White-backed Vulture

African White-backed Vulture

REHABILITATION

In an effort to decrease the continual loss of birds, VulPro rehabilitates injured vultures with the goal always being to release every able-bodied individual to the wild. Most of our rehabilitation occurs at our rehabilitation and breeding centre in the North West Province. Kate Webster, our Eastern Cape project partner, manages a rehabilitation unit, based out of her family farm in the Eastern Cape Province, where she cares for injured vultures in the region before either releasing them or sending them to the centre for further treatment or housing. Since VulPro’s inception over 530 Cape Vultures, 115 White-backed Vultures, 12 Lappet-faced Vultures and 2 White-headed Vultures have come into the facility primarily through rehabilitation.

We collect injured or grounded birds from every corner of southern Africa and train other organisations and individuals in emergency vulture care. Our busiest rehab season is from December through to and including March when fledgling Vultures are learning how to fly, forage, and compete with experienced adults at carcasses. Often young vultures are found wandering on the ground, starving, and unable to find appropriate take off sites to utilise wind currents and thermal updrafts. They simply require food and time to gain their strength and improve body condition before they can be released again. Occasionally the young birds are so emaciated they require more intensive care.

Our rehabilitation centre has expanded drastically over the last few years with an influx of birds irreparably damaged by power line collisions and electrocutions – by far the biggest threat to the birds in the Magaliesberg and Eastern Cape region and Provinces respectively. Vultures are incredibly resilient and can survive for weeks while grounded with broken wings. Unfortunately, the majority of these injuries are too severe or found too late to save the limb. Veterinarians at Ondersterpoort (University of Pretoria, Faculty of veterinary sciences) and the Broedestroom Veterinary Clinic routinely assist with amputations and other surgical procedures. We currently house over 222 vultures, the majority of which are non-releasable.

Releasing a short-stay rehabilitated vulture.

Releasing a short-stay rehabilitated vulture.

CONSERVATION BREEDING AND TRANSLOCATIONS

 VulPro’s conservation breeding programme began in 2011 with a small Cape Vulture colony and one incubator. As our captive non-releasable population continues to expand and mature, our breeding programme has seen a dramatic increase. In this way, we allow non-releasable birds to contribute to the wild populations. Our breeding programme now houses pairs of Cape Vultures, African White-backed Vultures, Lappet-faced Vultures, and White-headed Vultures. Our Cape Vulture colony is the most successful species housed on the property. In 2017 the colony successfully raised 10 chicks without human contact.

Conservation breeding and reintroduction programmes have been successfully implemented for several European vulture species (Eurasian Griffon Vulture, Bearded Vulture, Cinereous Vulture, Egyptian Vulture) all over Europe and are in progress for Asian species (Long-billed Vulture, Slender-billed Vulture, Oriental White-backed Vulture) in India, Pakistan, and Nepal. The need for these programmes in Africa is immense; however, VulPro is the only breeding facility on the continent committed to releasing offspring to the wild. We work to annually improve our protocols increasing our efficiency and success, as well as share our protocols with other organisations to benefit vultures continent-wide. While the programme started as a small endeavour, we now have world-class incubation facilities which care for up to 30 eggs a year. Ideally, each of our breeding pairs would be allowed to incubate, hatch, and raise their own chicks, yet for some pairs this is not possible. Every year some chicks are hand-raised and returned to the parents around 12 days old at which time the pair takes over all responsibilities.

The first 11 chicks in the programme were released in February 2015 at VulPro’s breeding facility in the Magaliesberg Mountains to supplement the local wild population. Three of these chicks were raised at the National Zoological Gardens in Pretoria, while seven were raised at VuPro. Every chick was fitted with patagial wing tags and GPS tracking devices. Due to the habitual food supply at VulPro’s vulture restaurant, none of the chicks left the release site and only made short excursions (less than 8km and/or less than 4 days) off the property. Consequently, we built a new release enclosure at an undisclosed location adjacent to a vulture feeding restaurant and a vulture colony to encourage release vultures to travel further. In 2017 12 captive bred vultures were released from the new site along with the sedentary survivors from the 2015 releases. In 2018 seven captive reared Cape Vultures were released from this site too. With each new release, methods; procedures and protocols change to improve the results of the releases. Analysis of the tracking data of these captive reared vultures indicate that the releases have been successful within an overall 60% of the released birds still surviving in the wild.

 

Vulture surveying training at Moletjie Nature Reserve.

Vulture surveying training at Moletjie Nature Reserve.

RESEARCH

VulPro’s research programmes cross a broad range of professional fields from veterinary, husbandry, breeding biology, spatial movements patterns, morphology, genetics to conservation threats and mitigation. We actively seek to build collaborations with other organisations within the local, national and international environments. Students are welcome to contact us from academic levels ie diplomas and upwards if they wish to collaborate. We currently have agreements within South Africa with the following universities; the University of KwaZulu-Natal, University of Cape Town and the University of Pretoria however, we are happy to work with any university should a student be based at a different academic institution.  Please feel free to contact CEO Kerri Wolter kerri.wolter@gmail.com or Head of Research Lara Jordan larajordanvulpro@gmail.com for assistance in this matter. Below you can find a list of some our current research areas which we are always looking to expand on.

VETERINARY RESEARCH

VulPro is proud to partner with the SAVE Project (Saving Asian Vultures from Extinction) and the University of Pretoria’s Faculty of Veterinary Sciences. Through pharmacological research conducted at VulPro with non-releasable African White-backed and Cape Vultures, the toxicity of the drug Diclofenac was confirmed, providing data which facilitated the drug’s legislative ban in several countries and continents. Through similar trials, Meloxicam, also known as Metacam, was determined to be the only known truly vulture-safe alternative NSAID. VulPro has also been instrumental in aiding toxicological research of Ketaprofen, Carprofuren, Flunixin, and Phenalbutazone.

Cape vulture chick and adult.

Cape vulture chick and adult.

EX-SITU RESEARCH

Our ex-situ population of Cape Vultures is one of the largest in the world. We consider this a privilege and honour and we see one of our roles is to learn more about the secrets of the species biology, husbandry, morphology and veterinary norms. We continually link this information in interface between the wild and captive populations that we work with. Current projects include a comparison of veterinary treatments for the treatment of bumble-foot, the morphological differences between male and female species, the relationship of different environments that cause stress bars in vulture plumage, egg shape and the relationship to successful hatch of vulture chicks, genetic relationship of founder ex-situ populations and establishing a range veterinary baseline information from wild, captive and rehabilitated vultures.

Volunteer Dael Stojakovic assisting in the field at Soutpansberg.

Volunteer Dael Stojakovic assisting in the field at Soutpansberg.

BREEDING MONITORING AND BIOLOGY

Census’s of vultures at breeding sites forms a good baseline to understanding trends within breeding populations. Cape Vultures are colonial cliff nesters that have been the recipient of much conservation action, yet they are still declining in some areas. Consequently, monitoring is a proactive way to identify declines in a standardised manner across years so that investigations into the threats in a localised area can be conducted in a timely manner. This allows implementation of mitigation measures and prevents losses from the population. VulPro focuses on six of the Cape Vulture colonies; in the North West, Gauteng and Limpopo provinces and in Botswana. This information informs other actions that VulPro implements.

Other species of vultures found in Southern Africa are mostly tree-nesters, little is known about the breeding biology and breeding site selection of these species. VulPro has been monitoring a range of different sites across six locations. Nest site activity is recorded annually at these field sites and camera traps are utilised at some nest sites to expand on the understanding of vulture biology and to identify potential localised threats. VulPro continually seeks to expand on this work to other sites and we encourage landowners to contact us if they notice breeding vultures on their land. Furthermore, if you are interested in becoming a volunteer to assist us in the monitoring of these species we encourage you to contact us: kerri.wolter@gmail.com

Kerri Wolter and volunteers colony monitoring.

Kerri Wolter and volunteers colony monitoring.

POPULATION MONITORING

Population monitoring is vital for understanding any population of threatened or declining species. It informs whether conservation efforts which have been and which are currently being implemented are having the desired effects over time. We run an active tagging and monitoring programme where information is collected into a tagging database, this information currently stands at over 30 000 entries. We have a few research projects on the go utilising this data to determine survival of the populations, to assist in determining the fate of released vultures after the transmitter’s life comes to an end, to understand vulture restaurant utilisation and, foraging and landscape utilisation.

Image from camera trap recording tag resighting.

Image from camera trap recording tag re-sighting.

SPATIAL MOVEMENT PATTERNS

VulPro currently has over 90 GPS transmitter data sets that are stored and are being utilised for different research projects. There are a further 18 transmitters currently still active on vultures presently. This data is used to identify “hot spots” for mitigation of dangerous power lines, identify active or popular feeding and bathing sites as well as unknown breeding and roosting sites, and occasionally identifies the cause of mortalities. Current projects include the identification of corridors of vulture movements in relation to power lines and the potential risk, foraging behaviour and land use of different vultures and identification of different roosting sites for different vulture species.

Charging and testing solar GPS transmitter before they are dispatched on vultures.

Charging and testing solar GPS transmitter before they are dispatched on vultures.

HOW TO GET INVOLVED

  • Join our VulPro volunteer group and get involved by becoming part of a team that picks up injured vultures to bring them in for treatment at VulPro. Commitment level – as and when you are available and a vulture is in need.
  • If you have interest in surveying, become a volunteer who assists employees conducting surveys. Commitment level – training is provided, work is arduous and requires dedication and some level of fitness.
  • Resighting‘s- when you are birding or on holiday look out for vultures with wing tags (see picture below). Send the following information to us and become part of this important database that determines survival of these endangered species. Ideal information: GPS co-ordinates, tag number, a photo is great, area, behaviour of the vulture e.g. roosting, feeding, the number of vultures the individual is with.
  • Please contact us if you have breeding vultures on your land so we can add nest sites to our database. Furthermore, we can come and survey for you or we can teach you to survey your own vultures.
  • Please contact CEO Kerri Wolter wolter@gmail.com if you want to get involved.

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